Author Archives: Jared

Data security can only be achieved by those empowered

Users of online services don’t have the ability (i.e. aren’t empowered) to secure the data stored by those services. Only the engineers and the companies that build the services can do that. So I agree with Cindy Cohn, who says: …we need to ensure that companies to whom we entrust our data have clear, enforceable obligations to keep […]

Continuous Delivery

Have you been working on a software project where your momentum seems to be slowing down? It tends to happen as features are added, because it requires time and effort to maintain and verify existing features with each and every release. Without automated tests, momentum slows, or worse, you end up shipping broken software from time […]

pre-commit

At work, we use git, and git supports hooks, including pre-commit hooks. Rather than write my own, and do it poorly, I’m using a tool called pre-commit, created by engineers at Yelp.com. To them, I offer my thanks.

ip and ss: better than ifconfig and netstat

I’ve been using Linux for a while now, so typing certain commands is fairly ingrained, like ‘ifconfig’ and ‘netstat’. I know about “ip addr”, which is more modern than ifconfig, and I use it sometimes. This week, I learned about ‘ss’, which is faster than ‘netstat’, and does more. My favorite invocation is “ss -tlp” to […]

Ubuntu, ecryptfs, and changing password

I changed my password on my Ubuntu system this week, and then found that I couldn’t log in, except on a virtual terminal. My home directory is encrypted, and apparently, it’s better to change a password using the graphical utilities, rather than the command line utilities. The following article was quite helpful in recovering: http://askubuntu.com/questions/281491/cant-log-in-after-password-change-ecryptfs

OpenWest notes

This past weekend, I attended the excellent #OpenWest conference, and I presented Scaling RabbitMQ. The volunteers that organized the conference deserve a huge amount of thanks. I can’t imagine how much work it was. I should also thank the conference sponsors. A local group of hardware engineers designed an amazing conference badge, built from a circuit […]

Linux, time and the year 2038

Software tends to live longer than we expect, as do embedded devices running Linux. Those that want to accurately handle time through the year 2038 and beyond will need to be updated. Fifteen years after Y2K, Linux kernel developers continue to refine support for time values that will get us past 2038. Jonathan Corbet, editor of LWN.net, explains […]

Containerization – the beginning of a long journey

I read this today, and thought it’s worth sharing: “The impact of containerization in redefining the enterprise OS is still vastly underestimated by most; it is a departure from the traditional model of a single-instance, monolithic, UNIX user space in favor of a multi-instance, multi-version environment using containers and aggregate packaging. We are talking about […]

In memorium of Artha Robinson

My last remaining grandparent, Artha Robinson, passed away last Saturday. I’m glad to have known her and my grandfather well, to have been able to visit with them and laugh together. I will miss grandma, although I’m glad that she is free from physical pain. As my grandfather often said, “growing old is not for […]

Ubuntu and .local hostnames in a corporate network

In the past, I’ve had trouble getting my Ubuntu machine to resolve the .local hostnames at work. I didn’t know why Ubuntu had this problem while other machines did not. When I did a DNS lookup, it failed, and ping of host.something.local failed. Yet ping of the hostname without the .something.local extension worked. Odd. I […]